All You Need To Know About Fuji C200 Film

All You Need To Know About Fuji C200 Film

2000 1125 Tamara Saade

It’s time for another article in our series of simple film reviews which can be read in about two minutes. These articles have all of the info that a new shooter will need to pick their film and have success shooting it. And today we’re looking at Fuji C200. With its punchy green packaging, it may be one of the consumer films par excellence available today.

At your local pharmacy, in most multimedia or camera shops, and even in supermarkets between the dairy and shampoo aisle, you might come across Fuji C200. A cheap price, fine grain, and quite saturated colors make this film a versatile and widely available option for everyday film photographers. 

Some context around Fuji C200. It’s made by Fujifilm, a Japanese company which produces digital cameras, instant film, and numerous 35mm and 120 format film (black-and-white, slide, color negative). Fuji was once a dominant force in film manufacturing, wrestling market share away from the original near-monopoly which was Kodak by introducing numerous high-quality film stock for every taste and style. They once produced dozens of films for professionals and amateur shootes alike. The company lately made headlines because the brand’s last high quality “professional” color negative film, Fuji Pro 400h, was discontinued. Now Fuji only offers a consumer-level line of cheap color negative film; Fuji C200 is one, Superia is another, each at speeds of 200 and 400.

While it’s a bit sad to see Fuji abandon the products which made them so special, at least it can be said that Fuji C200 might be the cheapest film on the market ($4.99 for a single roll on B&H’s website, less than Kodak Color Plus that I profiled last week). It also often comes in packs of three, which are sold for $13.99, or around $4.66 each roll. Depending on the market in which you live, this film might be called Fuji C200 or Fujicolor 200.

[Sample shots above were made by the author, Tamara Saade. Samples shots below were made by our writer Josh Solomon who wrote an in-depth article on Fuji C200 here]

Image Quality and Best Practices When Shooting Fuji C200

But enough with the history, how does the film perform? For such a cheap film, it shoots really well.

A photographer once told me that the packaging of each film indicates the strongest saturation you will obtain in the pictures. I’m not sure if this is an apocryphal tale or if there’s truth to it, but it is somewhat true that shots taken with Portra will have an emphasis on magenta tones, and pictures taken with ColorPlus will have more vivid reds (their boxes show magenta and red graphic design, respectively). Whether myth or a reality, this theory does actually apply to Fuji C200. It’s a great film to use in a sunny environment, thanks to its ISO of 200 of course, but also because it renders greens very well (and its box is green!). Maybe this is the only film to pack for your summer vacation because of its affordable price, and guaranteed colorful results. 

This film is definitely not a first choice for professional work, or editorial assignment. It does the job of making a photo, but it doesn’t capture the range of details, highlights, and shadows you would want for a high end assignment. If you’re a street photographer who likes to shoot without thinking, but does think about the budget, this film could also be an option. Think of it as the best film to train with, or to pop into a point-and-shoot. 

Fuji C200 also performs really well with a flash. In indoor settings or as soon as the sun starts to set, it’s imperative to use a flash with it because of its low sensitivity (that’s what that 200 ISO means). 

Another advantage of this film is its universality in terms of developing. Any lab that develops C41 will have no problem developing, scanning, or printing its pictures. The film can be pushed and pulled, with many pushing it two stops to ISO 800. Is pushing worth it? Not really. The film seems to render the best results shot a box speed or 400 ISO, but with 800 it seems to lose some of its sparkle. Pictures shot and pushed this way will be muddy and bland.

TLDR (too long didn’t read)

Fuji C200 is a great film to pop into a camera for a night out, or to test the functionality of a new camera , or to bulk buy for easy everyday snaps. Its cheap price and vibrant colors make it a great film for summer, travel, and holidays. And you’re almost guaranteed to find it in any shop selling film across the world. Although it’s not recommended to shoot it for a professional assignment, there’s no reason it can’t make a gorgeous photo – in the end, it’s all about the photographer’s vision and skill! 

Buy Fuji C200 from B&H Photo here

Buy Fuji C200 on eBay here

We also sell film in our shop F Stop Cameras


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Tamara Saade

Born and raised in Lebanon, Tamara Saade is a journalist and photographer now based in Beirut. She mainly covers Lebanon's ever-changing political landscape, focusing on human rights, from women and gender inequality issues, to the discrimination refugees and minorities faced in the country. Through photography, writing, videography, and social media coverage, she has expanded her coverage of human rights to the US, after living in New York for two years. She has bylines in Vice International, Al-Jazeera, the BBC, the Delacorte Review, amongst others. You can follow her work on Instagram (@tamarasaade_) and Twitter (@tamara_saade_).

All stories by:Tamara Saade
14 comments
  • Nice review… Thanks! I can’t find it now, but I think I recently read that manufacture of Superia in the the U.S. has been banned for “environmental” reasons! 😳🧐

    Can anyone else confirm or deny that?

  • Merlin Marquardt July 7, 2021 at 12:45 pm

    Looks good to me. What are the real (technical) differences between a consumer (amateur, cheap) film and a professional (expensive) film?

    • I’d suggest for a pro film, things like, fine grain, high micro-contrast and good subjective sharpness, with good colour consistency under a range of conditions – and of course the higher price. In reality most cheaper consumer grade films I find get to 80% of the performance of ‘professional grade’ films. It’s only when being super-critical or shooting in sub-optimal lighting conditions do the differences emerge. The images shown here really, really don’t do C200 much justice – they all look quite muddy and appear under-exposed to me. For instance, with advice from a pro photo lab, I would never even consider pushing any colour film, much less C200!

      C200, like ColorPlus, ideally needs bright sunny conditions and bold saturated colours to work really well. It can work okay in more dull light, but it has a tendency to boost browns and yellows if the light isn’t right and the saturation isn’t there – similar also to how ColorPlus performs in duller conditions. So much of this stuff, however, depends on the skill and care of your chosen developing / scanning company. The biggest variation I have found in how any film stock ‘looks’, comes from changes in lab – rather than the film stock itself.

      I was going to link a few good sunny images with C200 from my Flickr, but tellingly, I actually can’t find many!

      Here’s a one mixed light with some slightly brownish looking mid-tones:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/42550104185/in/dateposted-public/

      And one from a half-frame camera showing saturated sunlit colours:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/28105197327/in/dateposted-public/

      Apologies – I went off on a bit of ramble there! Not sure it answers your question, but hopefully it’s helpful 🙂

      • Merlin Marquardt July 7, 2021 at 9:24 pm

        Thanks for your views on film quality. I think you are right about many variables affecting the quality of the final image, be it printed or scanned. Color is a complicated phenomenon.

    • After years of reading unsure answers to this question, I actually have the answer straight from Kodak. I have converted the answer to a PDF and uploaded it to the site. You can read it from the horse’s mouth right here!

      For those who don’t want to read the whole document, it basically comes down to how a film will age. Film manufacturers design into their casual (non-professional) emulsions a manufacturing bias so that the film actually ages beneficially as the films sit on store shelves, or in customers’ living rooms or closets or even in the back of a camera. Kodak and other film makers assume (rightly) that consumer-level film tends to sit around, or be shot slowly, and then not developed right away. They assume that the average non-professional photographer might buy five rolls of film and then take five months or a year to shoot them. So they formulate the emulsion so that the colors may be allowed to shift during that storage period and then reach a sweet spot over time.

      Professional films are formulated to exact sensitivities and color profiles and manufactured with the intention that they will be bought, shot, and processed within days of distribution.

      Essentially, pro films look best when shot and developed as soon as possible after manufacture, and are made to exact and known “tolerances.” Consumer-grade film will look best when shot a few weeks or half-a-year after manufacture, and isn’t as precise a product.

      The PDF that I linked explains it much better than I am doing so here, possibly because I’m dead tired. Give it a read!

      • Merlin Marquardt July 7, 2021 at 9:39 pm

        Thank you, James, for the reference and explanation. It seems that the quality of the film is related to time and temperature and chemical kinetics. The chemicals are intrinsically unstable, and to compensate for that instability and to try to control it, time and temperature have to be controlled. Entropy.

  • great review!
    Bravo.
    Thank you.
    Great images, great film

  • Good review. I’ve been shooting mostly Kodak ColorPlus 200 for my budget color stock, and I’m pretty happy with the results.

    I want to give Fuji more of a try, but the availability of their stocks has been so spotty as of late. While it’s true that C200 is cheaper than ColorPlus at B&H, I don’t recall seeing C200 in stock any time I’ve looked. Many other online places list C200 as “on backorder” or “more on the way”. None of my local shops have it. And while I have found a few online sources, the shipping costs negate any savings over ColorPlus. I’m more concerned with what’s available, so shooting C200 will have to wait a bit.

    The one local place (Portland, OR) that I HAVE seen C200 recently is Rite Aid. But they want $25 for a three pack! Yikes. They also have single rolls of Superia 400 available for $17, which is more expensive than Portra or Ektachrome. I’ll pass.

  • One of my favorites, but it’s gotten hard to find. My experience is that it does better overexposed than underexposed – a trait it shares with Superia. It’s been a favorite film to test new old cameras with.

    • Great advice, and applicable to pretty much every color negative film. Shoot it a little over-exposed (one stop, maybe two) and most C41 film sings.

  • Usually I’m all about the content on this site. But I disagree with this statement:

    “This film is definitely not a first choice for professional work, or editorial assignment. It does the job of making a photo, but it doesn’t capture the range of details, highlights, and shadows you would want for a high end assignment.”

    Any disappointing results are down to the user – whether at the camera, developing or processing stage.

    I’ve never had any issues using C200, and have used it for all sorts of projects.

    Shot on C200:

    https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/08Em90

    https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/R6qKp6

    https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/13A017

    https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/P14EY1

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Tamara Saade

Born and raised in Lebanon, Tamara Saade is a journalist and photographer now based in Beirut. She mainly covers Lebanon's ever-changing political landscape, focusing on human rights, from women and gender inequality issues, to the discrimination refugees and minorities faced in the country. Through photography, writing, videography, and social media coverage, she has expanded her coverage of human rights to the US, after living in New York for two years. She has bylines in Vice International, Al-Jazeera, the BBC, the Delacorte Review, amongst others. You can follow her work on Instagram (@tamarasaade_) and Twitter (@tamara_saade_).

All stories by:Tamara Saade